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Catholic diocese starts new school for children fleeing war in Myanmar

Myanmar’s  Lashio diocese built a new school for children of people fleeing regional war in a remote village in Shan State. The new school is set up in Ban San village in the parish of the Sacred Heart Cathedral for children who have no access to education.
Catholic nuns are leading students in social performance outside the new school in Ban San village in the parish of Sacred Heart Cathedral in Lashio diocese (Photo: Office of Social Communication of Lashio diocese)

Myanmar’s  Lashio diocese built a new school for children of people fleeing regional war in a remote village in Shan State. The new school is set up in Ban San village in the parish of the Sacred Heart Cathedral for children who have no access to education.

Father George La Ring, the parish priest, posted a video message on Facebook on January 19.

“The new village called Ban San is occupied by people who flee the regional war from different parts of the area. It has been for three years as a new village. There is no school built yet for the new village,”  says Father La Ring in a video message.

Father La Ring, also the chancellor of Lashio Diocese, stated that children could not access school to learn. “ There is no school in the newly occupied village.”

“Anyone who goes to the village notices children wander around, as their parents don’t know how to educate them,” the priest said.

The priest started the school under the leadership of the Lashio diocese prelate and with the help of two nuns and three teachers. The nuns belonged to two different congregations: Sisters of Saint Joseph of Apparition and Sisters of Reparation. The parish is administrating the new school.

Ban San village is composed of people of different races and cultures.

“There are different races such as Kachin, Wah, Ta’ang, Shan, and Chinese residing in the village,” said  Father La Ring.

The priest noted that the villagers have difficulties procuring foodstuff, building shelter and settling in the area.

Father La Ring hopes that the new school will provide opportunities for education, guidance and inspiration.

The population of the children coming to the school is also mentioned in the announcement.

The new school opened with seventy students from nursery to the third standard and in kindergarten, there are forty children.

The priest is delighted to see the happy faces of children in school. “It is the first time for them going to school.”

“Besides the school curriculum,  the students are taught to relate with one another, basic healthcare, and how to behave politely,” Father La Ring said.

The priest said it is just the beginning. “The new school has many requirements such as books, pencils, and pens. Although donors have provided some materials, there is a need to purchase teaching aids for teachers, desks and chairs.”

“We still have plans to buy uniforms for all the students attending our school,” Father La Ring said.

Father La Ring expressed his gratitude to a family in Australia for their financial support to the children.

 

Radio Veritas Asia (RVA), a media platform of the Catholic Church, aims to share Christ. RVA started in 1969 as a continental Catholic radio station to serve Asian countries in their respective local language, thus earning the tag “the Voice of Asian Christianity.”  Responding to the emerging context, RVA embraced media platforms to connect with the global Asian audience via its 21 language websites and various social media platforms.