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Catholic nuns distribute food aids to the jobless in the slums of Yangon

Myanmar Salesian nuns in Hlaing Thar Yar distributed food aids to the poorest families in the slums of East Dagon, Yangon, on December 22.
Sister Agatha and Father Paul with rice bags on the tricycle. (Photo: Supplied)

Myanmar Salesian nuns in Hlaing Thar Yar distributed food aids to the poorest families in the slums of East Dagon, Yangon, on December 22.

The Salesian nuns distributed food aids to over 100 poorest Buddhist families; only eight were Catholics.

According to Sister Agatha Myit Kyi, Salesian nuns attempted to share food aids with the poor since September. Still, although the materials were already packed and ready, they could not do it due to D-Day, a nationwide revolution announced on September 7 by the National Unity Government as a defensive war against the military junta. They just gave the materials to someone else to deliver on their behalf.

“Those who receive food aids are just tenants and jobless in the slums of Yangon,” Sister Agatha told RVA News.

Sister Agatha Myit Kyi expressed her sentiment, “I feel so sorry while seeing them in need of more help.”

“The gospel reading of December 22 was about Mary’s praise to God. In reflection on the praise of Mary, I actualized the gospel reading with the tenants,” said Sister Agatha.

Father James Ei Shu of the Diocese of Pathein said, “Salesian Sisters implement the meaning of Christmas. Christ was born to show his compassion to all, especially to the poor and abandoned and to suffer with them.”

According to the United Nations, food insecurity is rising sharply in Myanmar due to the military coup and deepening financial crisis, with millions more people expected to go hungry in the coming months.

The World Food Program analysis showed that up to 3.4 million more people would struggle to afford food in the next three to six months, with urban areas worst affected as job losses mount in manufacturing, construction, and services and food prices rise.

 

Radio Veritas Asia (RVA), a media platform of the Catholic Church, aims to share Christ. RVA started in 1969 as a continental Catholic radio station to serve Asian countries in their respective local language, thus earning the tag “the Voice of Asian Christianity.”  Responding to the emerging context, RVA embraced media platforms to connect with the global Asian audience via its 21 language websites and various social media platforms.

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