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Kingdom Behavior: To Serve Others

There is a saying, "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." Today's Gospel text offers us something to ponder as we talk about power. One may ask why is it that we need to exercise power? Why does one have to be powerful?
"'Who was the greatest' ~ Mark 9:30-37" by Art4TheGlryOfGod by Sharon is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

There is a saying, "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." Today's Gospel text offers us something to ponder as we talk about power. One may ask why is it that we need to exercise power? Why does one have to be powerful?

I guess this need to have power and be powerful stems from a great sense of insecurity. We read in the Gospel text how Jesus' inner groups apostles, James and John, came up to Jesus with a request, one to sit at his right and the other on his left.

Jesus, in reply, does not respond to them in any way that would make them feel stupid of what they were asking. But takes the opportunity to enlighten them on what their request entails. Jesus moves from the standard understanding of power to rule and reign Supreme over others to the humble understanding of service where the other is greater than myself.

Jesus, in his discourse, tells them of the kingdom of God for which he came and belonging to this kingdom is a package deal of pain, suffering, humiliation, and service.

In life, we cannot resist the lure of power. We feel it gives us a sense of identity and security.

Let us not be misled with this misconception and go back to where we started; power corrupts absolute power corrupts absolutely.

May we anchor our lives in Jesus, who is powerful yet humble, and may we, in turn, learn from him, for he came not to be served but to serve. 

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